Film Review – Assassin’s Creed (2016)

imageTitle: Assassin’s Creed (2016)

Director: Justin Kurzel (Macbeth)

Cast: Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, Jeremy Irons, Brendan Gleeson, Michael Kenneth Williams, Charlotte Rampling

Plot: Death row criminal Callum Lynch (Fassbender) is taken in by mysterious company Abstergo and with the help of scientist Sofia (Cotillard) he soon finds himself sharing memories of one of his ancestors Aguilar (also Fassbender) by utilizing a machine known as the Animus. Once inside this world of memories Callum discovers an ancient war that could very well determine the fate of mankind.

“We work in the dark to serve the light. We are assassins”

Review by Eddie on 23/01/2017

I genuinely thought Assassin’s Creed was a high chance to once and for all break the videogame-movie curse.

A loaded and potentially thrilling subject matter, an A-list cast lead by star and producer Michael Fassbender, an upcoming Australian filmmaker taking the reigns of his first big budget event after impressing with back to back films (check out Australian film Snowtown for one truly eerie experience), Assassin’s seemed to be lining up all its element’s correctly but sadly this unsuspectingly dull event and wannabe franchise starter is another sad and sorry entry into the video game adaptation cannon.

To say that all of Assassin’s is a failure would be a disservice to the few things that do work. Some action moments show off the films potent possibilities (the whole idea of accessing your assassin ancestors memories is still pretty darn cool), but so much of this overly serious production fails to capture the imagination required for this story, and there’s likely to be more movie goers falling asleep than getting excited come screening time.

Anchored down by a laborious and unnecessarily complicated script that makes it awkwardly hard to follow what on earth is happening, as Michael Fassbender’s charisma-free Callum Lynch gets drawn into a dangerous world of assassin’s, apples and scientists, Assassin’s Creed fails to capture the audience as promising director Justin Kurzel’s lacking direction is brought down lower due to some totally misguided cinematography work, a bombastic score and some downright intrusive editing that seems to suggest the filmmaker isn’t yet ready for the big budget marketplace.

Also harming the film’s chances of being a success or at the very least being understandable is the film’s cast, but with a confused looking Fassbender leading the charge none of the supports from the likes of Marion Cotillard, Jeremy Irons or Brendan Gleeson get to do anything of note, although many of the worlds greatest actor’s couldn’t make Assassin’s dialogue or plot line work.

Not the worst video game movie of the last few years but certainly the most disappointing, Assassin’s Creed might show tidbits of a better film and it’s forays into the past are often exciting but far too often Assassin’s is quite simply a boorish chore that fails to encapsulate what made the gaming series such a hit and showcases Hollywood still cant grasp the essence of taking video games and turning them into a whole different beast.

1 and a half monitor watching employee out of 5

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16 responses to “Film Review – Assassin’s Creed (2016)

  1. One of the biggest things for me is that i’m not familiar with the games at all, so i felt lost the whole time since nothing was really explained. That’s one of their biggest mistakes was not taking non-gamers into consideration as far as the script.

  2. Good review. I think the movie was starting to head in the right direction, but the second half of the movie was boring (I actually started to fall asleep during one scene). The ending was anti-climatic. The scenes in the past were probably the only true highlight of the film.

  3. I never fall asleep when seeing a movie in the theatre, but with this one I missed a good portion of the middle. I had such high hopes for it too 😦

  4. Pingback: Film Review – Trespass Against Us (2016) | Jordan and Eddie (The Movie Guys)·

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